Odyssey Online Learning

List of Courses

View all of our core course and electives included in online learning with Odyssey.


  • 3D Art I: Modeling

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This course introduces students to 3D modeling tools and concepts.

    Course Description

    This course introduces students to 3D modeling tools and concepts. Using Blender, the popular open-source 3D modeling package, students learn the basics of creating shapes, adding textures and lighting, and rendering. By the end of the course, students produce a series of increasingly sophisticated projects for their 3D portfolio. This course is suitable for students with no prior experience in 3D game design or digital media authoring tools.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • 3D Art II: Animation

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    In this advanced course, students build on the skills they developed in 3D Art I to learn 3D animation techniques.

    Course Description

    In this advanced course, students build on the skills they developed in 3D Art I to learn 3D animation techniques. Using Blender, a powerful open-source modeling tool, students master the basics of animation—rigging, bones, and movement—while learning how to apply traditional animation techniques to their 3D models.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Accounting (Semester 1)

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Full Credit

    Introductory course, in the foundational skills needed for college accounting courses, office work, and small businesses.

    Course Description

    In this introductory course, students gain a foundation in the skills needed for college accounting courses, office work, and managing their own small businesses. They also build an appreciation for the role of accounting in managing a profitable business. The course provides an overview of the three forms of accounting: financial, cost, and management accounting. Instructional material covers the basic concept conventions and rules of the double entry system—and includes techniques for analyzing ratios from a balance sheet. The concepts of ethics, integrity, confidentiality, and rigor are woven through all the units.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Achieving Your Career and College Goals

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Students explore their options for life after high school and implement plans to achieve their goals

    Course Description

    Students explore their options for life after high school and implement plans to achieve their goals. They identify their aptitudes, skills, and preferences, and explore a wide range of potential careers. They investigate the training and education required for the career of their choice, and create a plan to be sure that their work in high school is preparing them for the next step. They also receive practical experience in essential skills such as searching and applying for college, securing financial aid, writing a resume and cover letter, and interviewing for a job. This course is geared toward 11th and 12th graders.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Algebra I Honors Semester 1

    Math (inc AP)Full Credit

    This course prepares students for more advanced courses while they develop algebraic fluency.

    Course Description

    This course prepares students for more advanced courses while they develop algebraic fluency, learn the skills needed to solve equations, and perform manipulations with numbers, variables, equations, and inequalities. They also learn concepts central to the abstraction and generalization that algebra makes possible. Topics include simplifying expressions involving variables, fractions, exponents, and radicals; working with integers, rational numbers, and irrational numbers; graphing and solving equations and inequalities; using factoring, formulas, and other techniques to solve quadratic and other polynomial equations; formulating valid mathematical arguments using various types of reasoning; and translating word problems into mathematical equations and then using the equations to solve the original problems. This course includes all the topics in Algebra I (Comprehensive), but includes more challenging assignments and optional challenge activities. Each semester also includes an independent honors project.

    Prerequisites

    Success in previous math course and teacher/school counselor recommendation.

  • Algebra I Semester 1

    Math (inc AP)Full Credit

    Students develop algebraic fluency by learning the skills needed to solve equations and perform manipulations with numbers, variables, equations, and inequalities.

    Course Description

    Students develop algebraic fluency by learning the skills needed to solve equations and perform manipulations with numbers, variables, equations, and inequalities. They also learn concepts central to the abstraction and generalization that algebra makes possible. Topics include simplifying expressions involving variables, fractions, exponents, and radicals; working with integers, rational numbers, and irrational numbers; graphing and solving equations and inequalities; using factoring, formulas, and other techniques to solve quadratic and other polynomial equations; formulating valid mathematical arguments using various types of reasoning; and translating word problems into mathematical equations and then using the equations to solve the original problems. Compared to Algebra I (Core), this course has a more rigorous pace and more challenging assignments and assessments. It covers additional topics, including translating functions, higher degree roots, and more complex factoring techniques.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Algebra II Honors Semester 1

    Math (inc AP)Full Credit

    This course builds upon advanced algebraic concepts covered in Algebra I and prepares students for advanced-level courses.

    Course Description

    This course builds upon advanced algebraic concepts covered in Algebra I and prepares students for advanced-level courses. Students extend their knowledge and understanding by solving open ended problems and thinking critically. Topics include functions and their graphs, quadratic functions, complex numbers, and advanced polynomial functions. Students are introduced to rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions; sequences and series; probability; statistics; and conic sections. Students work on additional challenging assignments, assessments, and research projects.

    Prerequisites

    Algebra I (Comprehensive) or Honors Algebra I, Geometry (Comprehensive) or Honors Geometry (or equivalents), and teacher/school counselor recommendation.

  • Algebra II Semester 1

    Math (inc AP)Full Credit

    This course builds upon algebraic concepts covered in Algebra I and prepares students for advanced level courses.

    Course Description

    This course builds upon algebraic concepts covered in Algebra I and prepares students for advanced level courses. Students extend their knowledge and understanding by solving open-ended problems and thinking critically. Topics include conic sections, functions and their graphs, quadratic functions, inverse functions, and advanced polynomial functions. Students are introduced to rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions; sequences and series; and data analysis.

    Prerequisites

    Algebra I (Comprehensive) and Geometry (Comprehensive) or equivalents.

  • Anthropology

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    In this course, students are introduced to the five main branches of anthropology.

    Course Description

    Anthropologists research the characteristics and origins of the cultural, social, and physical development of humans and consider why some cultures change and others come to an end. In this course, students are introduced to the five main branches of anthropology: physical, cultural, linguistic, social, and archeological. Through instruction and their own investigation and analysis, students explore these topics while considering their relationship to other social sciences such as history, geography, sociology, economics, political science, and psychology. Emulating professional anthropologists, students apply their knowledge and observational skills to the real-life study of cultures in the United States and around the world. The content in this course meets or exceeds the standards of the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS).

    Prerequisites

    World History (or equivalent) recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite, but not required.

  • AP Biology (Semester 1)

    ScienceFull Credit

    This course guides students to a deeper understanding of biological concepts, including the diversity and unity of life, energy and the processes of life, homeostasis, and genetics.

    Course Description

    This course guides students to a deeper understanding of biological concepts, including the diversity and unity of life, energy and the processes of life, homeostasis, and genetics. Students learn about regulation, communication, and signaling in living organisms, and interactions of biological systems. Students carry out a number of learning activities, including readings, interactive exercises, extension activities, hands-on and virtual laboratory experiments, and practice assessments. These activities are designed to help students gain an understanding of the science process and critical-thinking skills necessary to answer questions on the AP Biology Exam. The content aligns to the sequence of topics recommended by the College Board.

    Prerequisites

    Biology, Chemistry, Algebra I, and teacher/school counselor recommendation required; success in Algebra II highly recommended.

  • AP Calculus AB (Semester 1)

    Math (inc AP)Full Credit

    This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level calculus course.

    Course Description

    This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level calculus course. Calculus helps scientists, engineers, and financial analysts understand the complex relationships behind real-world phenomena. Students learn to evaluate the soundness of proposed solutions and apply mathematical reasoning to real-world models. Students also learn to understand change geometrically and visually (by studying graphs of curves), analytically (by studying and working with mathematical formulas), numerically (by seeing patterns in sets of numbers), and verbally. Students prepare for the AP Exam and further studies in science, engineering, and mathematics.

    Prerequisites

    Honors Geometry, Honors Algebra II, Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry (or equivalents), and teacher/school counselor recommendation

  • AP Calculus BC (Semester 1)

    Full Credit

    This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level calculus course.

    Course Description

    This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level calculus course. In this course, students study functions, limits, derivatives, integrals, and infinite series. Calculus helps scientists, engineers, and financial analysts understand the complex relationships behind real-world phenomena. Students learn to evaluate the soundness of proposed solutions and apply mathematical reasoning to real world models. Students also learn to understand change geometrically and visually (by studying graphs of curves), analytically (by studying and working with mathematical formulas), numerically (by seeing patterns in sets of numbers), and verbally. Students prepare for the AP Exam and further studies in science, engineering, and mathematics.

    Prerequisites

    Honors Geometry, Honors Algebra II, Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry (or equivalents), and teacher/school counselor recommendation.

  • AP English Language and Composition (Semester 1)

    English (inc AP)Full Credit

    Students learn to understand and analyze complex works by a variety of authors.

    Course Description

    Students learn to understand and analyze complex works by a variety of authors. They explore the richness of language, including syntax, imitation, word choice, and tone. They also learn composition style and process, starting with exploration, planning, and writing. This continues with editing, peer review, rewriting, polishing, and applying what they learn to academic, personal, and professional contexts. In this equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, students prepare for the AP Exam and for further study in communications, creative writing, journalism, literature, and composition.

    Prerequisites

    Honors Literary Analysis and Composition II (or equivalent) or Honors American Literature (or equivalent), and teacher/school counselor recommendation.

  • AP English Literature and Composition (Semester 1)

    English (inc AP)Full Credit

    The equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, students are immersed in novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various periods.

    Course Description

    In this course, the equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, students are immersed in novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various periods. Students read and write daily, using a variety of multimedia and interactive activities, interpretive writing assignments, and discussions. The course places special emphasis on reading comprehension, structural and critical analyses of written works, literary vocabulary, and recognizing and understanding literary devices. Students prepare for the AP Exam and for further study in creative writing, communications, journalism, literature, and composition.

    Prerequisites

    Honors Literary Analysis and Composition II (or equivalent) or Honors American Literature (or equivalent), and teacher/school counselor recommendation.

  • AP Environmental Science (Semester 1)

    ScienceFull Credit

    Students examine the natural world’s interrelationships in AP Environmental Science.

    Course Description

    Students examine the natural world’s interrelationships in AP Environmental Science. During this two-semester course, they identify and analyze environmental problems and their effects and evaluate the effectiveness of proposed solutions. They learn to think like environmental scientists as they make predictions based on observation, write hypotheses, design and complete fi eld studies and experiments, and reach conclusions based on the analysis of resulting data. Students apply the concepts of environmental science to their everyday experiences, current events, and issues in science, politics, and society. The course provides opportunities for guided inquiry and student centered learning that build critical-thinking skills. Prerequisite for enrollment is two years of prior coursework in laboratory sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, or Physics).

    Prerequisites

    Successful completion of honors or advanced-level high school science courses and teacher/school counselor recommendation.

  • AP Macroeconomics

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course.

    Course Description

    This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Students learn why and how the world economy can change from month to month, how to identify trends in our economy, and how to use those trends to develop performance measures and predictors of economic growth or decline. Students also examine how individuals and institutions are influenced by employment rates, government spending, inflation, taxes, and production. Students prepare for the AP Exam and for further study in business, political science, and history.

    Prerequisites

    Honors Algebra II (or equivalent) and teacher/school counselor recommendation.

  • AP Microeconomics

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course.

    Course Description

    This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Students explore the behavior of individuals and businesses as they exchange goods and services in the marketplace. Students learn why the same product can cost different amounts at different stores, in different cities, and at different times. Students also learn to spot patterns in economic behavior and learn how to use those patterns to explain buyer and seller behavior under various conditions. Lessons promote an understanding of the nature and function of markets, the role of scarcity and competition, the influence of factors such as interest rates on business decisions, and the role of government in the economy. Students prepare for the AP Exam and for further study in business, history, and political science.

    Prerequisites

    Honors Algebra II (or equivalent) and teacher/school counselor recommendation

  • AP Psychology

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course.

    Course Description

    This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Students receive an overview of current psychological research methods and theories. They explore the therapies used by professional counselors and clinical psychologists, and examine the reasons for normal human reactions: how people learn and think, the process of human development and human aggression, altruism, intimacy, and self-reflection. They study core psychological concepts, such as the brain and sensory functions, and learn to gauge human reactions, gather information, and form meaningful syntheses. Students prepare for the AP Exam and for further studies in psychology and life sciences.

    Prerequisites

    Honors Biology (or equivalent) and teacher/school counselor recommendation.

  • AP Statistics (Semester 1)

    Math (inc AP)Full Credit

    This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course.

    Course Description

    This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Statistics—the art of drawing conclusions from imperfect data and the science of real-world uncertainties—plays an important role in many fields. Students collect, analyze, graph, and interpret real-world data. They learn to design and analyze research studies by reviewing and evaluating examples from real research. Students prepare for the AP Exam and for further study in science, sociology, medicine, engineering, political science, geography, and business.

    Prerequisites

    Honors Algebra II (or equivalent) and teacher/school counselor recommendation.

  • AP U.S. Government and Politics

    Social StudiesHalf Credit

    This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course.

    Course Description

    This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course. Students explore the operations and structure of the U.S. government and the behavior of the electorate and politicians. Students gain the analytical perspective necessary to evaluate political data, hypotheses, concepts, opinions, and processes and learn how to gather data about political behavior and develop their own theoretical analysis of American politics. Students also build the skills they need to examine general propositions about government and politics, and to analyze specific relationships between political, social, and economic institutions. Students prepare for the AP Exam and for further study in political science, law, education, business, and history.

    Prerequisites

    Honors U.S. History (or equivalent) and teacher/school counselor recommendation.

  • Archaeology EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This course focuses on the techniques, methods, and theories that guide the study of the past.

    Course Description

    George Santayana once said, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." The field of archaeology helps us better understand the events and societies of the past that have helped shape our modern world. This course focuses on the techniques, methods, and theories that guide the study of the past. Students learn how archaeological research is conducted and interpreted as well as how artifacts are located and preserved. Students also learn about the relationship of material items to culture and what we can learn about past societies from these items.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Art in World Cultures EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Students will learn about some of the greatest artists while also creating art of their own.

    Course Description

    Who is the greatest artist of all time? Leonardo da Vinci? Claude Monet? Michelangelo? Pablo Picasso? Is the greatest artist of all time someone whose name has been lost to history? Students will learn about some of the greatest artists while also creating art of their own, including digital art. The course explores the basic principles and elements of art, how to critique art, and how to examine some of the traditional art of the Americas, Africa, and Oceania in addition to the development of Western art.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Astronomy EE

    ScienceHalf Credit

    This course introduces students to the study of astronomy, including its history and development.

    Course Description

    Why do stars twinkle? Is it possible to fall into a black hole? Will the sun ever stop shining? Since the first glimpse of the night sky, humans have been fascinated with the stars, planets, and universe. This course introduces students to the study of astronomy, including its history and development; basic scientific laws of motion and gravity; the concepts of modern astronomy; and the methods used by astronomers to learn more about the universe. Additional topics include the solar system; the Milky Way and other galaxies; and the sun and stars. Using online tools, students examine the life cycle of stars, the properties of planets, and the exploration of space.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Biology (Semester 1)

    ScienceFull Credit

    In this comprehensive course, students investigate the chemistry of living things.

    Course Description

    In this comprehensive course, students investigate the chemistry of living things: the cell, genetics, evolution, the structure and function of living things, and ecology. The program consists of in depth online lessons, including extensive animations, an associated reference book, collaborative explorations, virtual laboratories, and hands-on laboratory experiments students can conduct at home.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Biology Honors (Semester 1)

    ScienceFull Credit

    A challenging honors-level biology curriculum, focusing on the chemistry of living things.

    Course Description

    This course provides students with a challenging honors-level biology curriculum, focusing on the chemistry of living things: the cell, genetics, evolution, the structure and function of living things, and ecology. The program consists of advanced online lessons, including extensive animations, an associated reference book, collaborative explorations, and hands-on laboratory experiments students can conduct at home. Honors activities include debates, research papers, extended collaborative laboratories, and virtual laboratories.

    Prerequisites

    Teacher/School Counselor recommendation.

  • Biotechnology EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    In this course, students will explore the science behind biotechnology.

    Course Description

    In today’s world, biotechnology helps us grow food, fight diseases, and create alternative fuels. In this course, students will explore the science behind biotechnology and how this science is being used to solve medical and environmental problems.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Calculus (Semester 1)

    Math (inc AP)Full Credit

    This course provides a comprehensive survey of differential and integral calculus concepts.

    Course Description

    This course provides a comprehensive survey of differential and integral calculus concepts, including limits, derivative and integral computation, linearization, Riemann sums, the fundamental theorem of calculus, and differential equations. Content is presented across ten units and covers various applications, including graph analysis, linear motion, average value, area, volume, and growth and decay models. In this course, students use an online textbook that supplements the instruction they receive and provides additional opportunities to practice using the content they’ve learned. Students will use an embedded graphing calculator applet (GCalc) for their work on this course; the soft ware for the applet can be downloaded at no charge.

    Prerequisites

    Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry (or equivalent).

  • Careers in Criminal Justice EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This course provides an overview of the wide range of career opportunities in the criminal justice system.

    Course Description

    The criminal justice system may be a good career option for students who want to help prevent crime and maintain order in society. This course provides an overview of the wide range of career opportunities in the criminal justice system, from law enforcement to forensic scientists to lawyers and judges. Students will learn about the trial process, the juvenile justice system, and the correctional system. Students will explore careers in each area, including job expectations and training requirements.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Chemistry (Semester 1)

    Science

    This comprehensive course gives students a solid basis to move on to future studies.

    Course Description

    This comprehensive course gives students a solid basis to move on to future studies. The course provides an in-depth survey of all key areas, including atomic structure, chemical bonding and reactions, solutions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The course includes direct online instruction, virtual laboratories, and related assessments, used with a problem-solving book.

    Prerequisites

    Solid grasp of algebra basics, evidenced by success in Algebra I (Core) or equivalents.

  • Chemistry Honors (Semester 1)

    ScienceFull Credit

    This advanced course gives students a solid basis to move on to more advanced courses.

    Course Description

    This advanced course gives students a solid basis to move on to more advanced courses. The challenging course surveys all key areas, including atomic structure, chemical bonding and reactions, solutions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry, enhanced with challenging model problems and assessments. Students complete community-based written research projects, treat aspects of chemistry that require individual research and reporting, and participate in online threaded discussions.

    Prerequisites

    Success in previous science course, Algebra I (Comprehensive), Honors Algebra I (or equivalents), and teacher/school counselor recommendation.

  • Civics

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This one-semester course provides students with a basic understanding of civic life, politics, and government.

    Course Description

    Civics is the study of citizenship and government. This one-semester course provides students with a basic understanding of civic life, politics, and government, and a short history of government’s foundation and development in this country. Students learn how power and responsibility are shared and limited by government, the impact American politics has on world affairs, the place of law in the American constitutional system, and which rights the American government guarantees its citizens. Students also examine how the world is organized politically and how civic participation in the American political system compares to that in other societies around the world today.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Competency HS French I (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit


    Introduction to French.

    Course Description

    Students begin their introduction to French by focusing on the four key areas of world language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases; comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns; participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries; and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Competency HS French II (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    Continuation of French I by further expanding the students knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts.

    Course Description

    Students continue their study of French by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and reading passages more fully, but they also are able to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; understand common vocabulary terms and phrases; use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing; participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries; and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By the second semester, the course is conducted almost entirely in French. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL.

    Prerequisites

    French I

  • Competency HS French III (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    Students further deepen their understanding of French by focusing on the three modes of communication.

    Course Description

    Students further deepen their understanding of French by focusing on the three modes of communication: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. Each unit consists of a variety of activities which teach the students how to understand more difficult written and spoken passages, to communicate with others through informal speaking and writing interactions, and to express their thoughts and opinions in more formal spoken and written contexts. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; use correct vocabulary terms and phrases naturally; incorporate a wide range of grammar concepts consistently and correctly while speaking and writing; participate in conversations covering a wide range of topics and respond appropriately to conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various French-speaking countries; read and analyze important pieces of literature; and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is conducted almost entirely in French, and has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL.

    Prerequisites

    French II

  • Competency HS German I (Semester 1)

    Department: Foreign Language
    Full Credit

  • Competency HS German II (Semester 1)

    Department: Foreign Language
    Full Credit

  • Competency HS Latin I (Semester 1)

    Department: Foreign Language
    Full Credit

  • Competency HS Latin II (Semester 1)

    Department: Foreign Language
    Full Credit

  • Competency HS Mandarin (Chinese) I (Semester 1)

    Department: Foreign Language
    Full Credit

  • Competency HS Mandarin (Chinese) II (Semester II)

    Department: Foreign Language
    Full Credit

  • Competency HS Spanish I (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    Students begin their introduction to Spanish by focusing on the four key areas of world language study.

    Course Description

    Students begin their introduction to Spanish by focusing on the four key areas of world language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases; comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns; participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries; and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Competency HS Spanish II (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    Students continue their study of Spanish by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts.

    Course Description

    Students continue their study of Spanish by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and reading passages more fully, but they also are able to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; understand common vocabulary terms and phrases; use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing; participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries; read and analyze important pieces of Hispanic literature; and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is conducted almost entirely in Spanish, and has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL.

    Prerequisites

    Spanish I

  • Competency HS Spanish III (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    Students further deepen their understanding of Spanish by focusing on the three modes of communication.

    Course Description

    Students further deepen their understanding of Spanish by focusing on the three modes of communication: interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational. Each unit consists of a variety of activities which teach the students how to understand more difficult written and spoken passages, to communicate with others through informal speaking and writing interactions, and to express their thoughts and opinions in more formal spoken and written contexts. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; use correct vocabulary terms and phrases naturally; incorporate a wide range of grammar concepts consistently and correctly while speaking and writing; participate in conversations covering a wide range of topics and respond appropriately to conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various Spanish-speaking countries; read and analyze important pieces of Hispanic literature; and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course is conducted almost entirely in Spanish, and has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL.

    Prerequisites

    Spanish III

  • Comprehensive Physics (Semester 1)

    ScienceFull Credit

    This course provides a comprehensive survey of all key areas of physics.

    Course Description

    This course provides a comprehensive survey of all key areas: physical systems, measurement, kinematics, dynamics, momentum, energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, and magnetism, and introduces students to modern physics topics such as quantum theory and the atomic nucleus. The course gives students a solid basis to move on to more advanced courses later in their academic careers. The program consists of online instruction, virtual laboratories, and related assessments, plus an associated problem-solving book.

    Prerequisites

    Algebra II and Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry (or equivalents).

  • Computer Fundamentals (Semester 1)

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Full Credit

    In this two-semester introductory course, students become familiar with the basic principles of a personal computer.

    Course Description

    In this two-semester introductory course, students become familiar with the basic principles of a personal computer, including the internal hardware, the operating system, and software applications. Students practice using key applications such as word processors, spreadsheets, and presentation software, and examine social and ethical issues around the Internet, information, and security. In the first semester, the focus is on the fundamentals: learning and using applications and understanding the basic roles and responsibilities of soft ware, hardware, and operating systems. In the second semester, the focus is on gathering and analyzing data, and using the right tools and methods to collect and present data. This course should not be taken if the student has already completed Computer Literacy.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Computer Literacy

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    In this introductory course, students become familiar with the basic principles of a personal computer.

    Course Description

    Students must be able to use technology effectively to research, organize, create, and evaluate information. In this introductory course, students become familiar with the basic principles of a personal computer, including the internal hardware, operating system, and software applications. Students practice using key applications such as word processing, spreadsheet and presentation software, and examine social and ethical issues around the Internet, information, and security. In the first part of the course, the focus is on the fundamentals: learning and using applications, and understanding the basic roles and responsibilities of the software, hardware, and operating system. The second part of the course focuses on gathering and analyzing data, and using the right tools and methods to collect and present data. This course should not be taken if the student has already completed Computer Fundamentals.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Contemporary World Issues (Semester 1)

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Full Credit

    In this course, students will compare the geography, governments, economies, and cultures of the world.

    Course Description

    In this course, students will compare the geography, governments, economies, and cultures of the world. Emphasis will be placed on learning about the civics, politics, economics, structures, processes and policies of the United States and then comparing them with those of the international community. Students will use what they know and learn about the United States and the world to analyze current events and contemporary issues. Reasoning and research skills will be applied to the content throughout the course.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Creative Writing (Semester 1)

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Full Credit

    Students explore a range of creative writing genres, including fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, drama, and multimedia writing.

    Course Description

    Students explore a range of creative writing genres, including fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, drama, and multimedia writing. Students study examples of writing through classic and contemporary selections and apply that knowledge and understanding to their writing. In addition, students develop an intimate understanding of the writing process and its application to various projects. As students move through the course, they will understand and evaluate the writings of others, and be able to apply the evaluation criteria to their own writing. By the end of the course, students will have created a well-developed portfolio of finished written works. Learning activities include reading; listening; discussing; writing; multiple choice games; self-check activities; and reflective journals. The unit structure includes the broader idea of the unit as defined by the main heading. Units include a combination of activities and culminate in a submittal of the finished unit project. Unit projects will be developed in phases throughout each section of the unit. Unit lessons and performance tasks have been scaffolded carefully to help students achieve deeper levels of understanding.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Crimonology EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This course introduces students to the field of criminology, the study of crime.

    Course Description

    In the modern world, many citizens share a concern about criminal behaviors and intent. This course introduces students to the field of criminology, the study of crime. Students look at possible explanations for crime from psychological, biological, and sociological perspectives; explore the categories and social consequences of crime; and investigate how the criminal justice system handles criminals and their misdeeds. The course explores some key questions: Why do some individuals commit crimes while others do not? What aspects of culture and society promote crime? Why are different punishments given for the same crime? What factors—from arrest to punishment—help shape the criminal case process?

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Digital Photography

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Students are introduced to the history of photography and basic camera functions.

    Course Description

    This course focuses on the basics of photography, including building an understanding of aperture, shutter speed, lighting, and composition. Students are introduced to the history of photography and basic camera functions. They use the basic techniques of composition and camera functions to build a portfolio of images, capturing people, landscapes, close-ups, and action photographs.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Earth Science (Semester 1)

    ScienceFull Credit

    The course provides an in-depth survey of all key areas of earth science.

    Course Description

    This comprehensive course gives students a solid basis to move on to future studies. The course provides an in-depth survey of all key areas, including atomic structure, chemical bonding and reactions, solutions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The course includes direct online instruction, virtual laboratories, and related assessments, used with a problem-solving book.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Economics

    Social StudiesHalf Credit

    In this course on economic principles, students explore choices they face as producers, consumers, investors, and taxpayers.

    Course Description

    In this course on economic principles, students explore choices they face as producers, consumers, investors, and taxpayers. Students apply what they learn to real-world simulation problems. Topics of study include markets from historic and contemporary perspectives; supply and demand; theories of early economic philosophers such as Adam Smith and David Ricardo; theories of value; money (what it is, how it evolved, the role of banks, investment houses, and the Federal Reserve); Keynesian economics; how capitalism functions, focusing on productivity, wages, investment, and growth; issues of capitalism such as unemployment, inflation, and the national debt; and a survey of markets in such areas as China, Europe, and the Middle East.

    Prerequisites

    U.S. Government and Politics (Comprehensive) or equivalent is recommended, but not required.

  • English 1 Honors Semester 1

    English (inc AP)Full Credit

    This course challenges students to improve their written and oral communication skills, while strengthening their ability to understand and analyze literature in a variety of genres.

    Course Description

    This course challenges students to improve their written and oral communication skills, while strengthening their ability to understand and analyze literature in a variety of genres. Students enrolled in this course work on independent projects that enhance their skills and challenge them to consider complex ideas and apply the knowledge they have learned. Literature: Students read a broad array of short stories, poetry, drama, novels, autobiographies, essays, and famous speeches. The course guides students in the close reading and critical analysis of classic works of literature, and helps them appreciate the texts and the contexts in which the works were written. Literary selections range from the Greek tragedy Antigone to Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet to contemporary pieces by authors such as Annie Dillard and Maya Angelou. Language Skills: Students broaden their composition skills by examining model essays in various genres by student and published writers. Through in-depth planning, organizing, draft ing, revising, proofreading, and feedback, they hone their writing skills. Students build on their grammar, usage, and mechanics skills with in-depth study of sentence analysis and structure, agreement, and punctuation, reinforced by online activities. Student vocabularies are enhanced through the study of Greek and Latin root words, improving students' ability to decipher the meanings of new words.

    Prerequisites

    Middle school English/language arts and teacher/school counselor recommendation.

  • English 1 Semester 1

    English (inc AP)Full Credit

    This course challenges students to improve their written and oral communication skills, while strengthening their ability to understand and analyze literature in a variety of genres.

    Course Description

    This course challenges students to improve their written and oral communication skills, while strengthening their ability to understand and analyze literature in a variety of genres. Literature: Students read a broad array of short stories, poetry, drama, novels, autobiographies, essays, and famous speeches. The course guides students in the close reading and critical analysis of classic works of literature, and helps them appreciate the texts and the contexts in which the works were written. Literary selections range from classic works such as Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet to contemporary pieces by authors such as Maya Angelou. Language Skills: Students broaden their composition skills by examining model essays in various genres by student and published writers. Through in-depth planning, organizing, draft ing, revising, proofreading, and feedback, they hone their writing skills. Students build on their grammar, usage, and mechanics skills with in-depth study of sentence analysis and structure, agreement, and punctuation, reinforced by online activities (Skills Updates). Student vocabularies are enhanced through the study of Greek and Latin root words, improving students’ ability to decipher the meanings of new words.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • English 2 Honors Semester 1

    English (inc AP)Full Credit

    In this course, students build on existing literature and composition skills and move on to higher levels of sophistication.

    Course Description

    In this course, students build on existing literature and composition skills and move on to higher levels of sophistication. Students work on independent projects that enhance their skills and challenge them to consider complex ideas and apply the knowledge they have learned. Literature: Students hone their skills of literary analysis by reading short stories, poetry, drama, novels, and works of nonfiction, both classic and modern. Authors include W. B. Yeats, Sara Teasdale, Langston Hughes, Robert Frost, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Kate Chopin, Amy Tan, Richard Rodriguez, and William Shakespeare. Students have a choice of novels and longer works to study, including works by Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, and Elie Wiesel. Language Skills: In this course, students become more proficient writers and readers. In composition lessons, students analyze model essays from readers’ and writers’ perspectives, focusing on ideas and content, structure and organization, style, word choice, and tone. Students receive feedback during the writing process to help them work toward a polished final draft . In addition to writing formal essays, résumés, and business letters, students write and deliver a persuasive speech. Students expand their knowledge of grammar, usage, and mechanics through sentence analysis and structure, syntax, agreement, and conventions. Unit pretests identify skills to address more fully. Students strengthen their vocabularies through thematic units focused on word roots, suffixes and prefixes, context clues, and other important vocabulary-building strategies.

    Prerequisites

    Honors Literary Analysis and Composition I or equivalent and teacher/school counselor recommendation.

  • English 2 Semester 1

    English (inc AP)Full Credit

    In this course, students build on existing literature and composition skills and move to higher levels of sophistication.

    Course Description

    In this course, students build on existing literature and composition skills and move to higher levels of sophistication. Literature: Students hone their skills of literary analysis by reading short stories, poetry, drama, novels, and works of nonfiction, both classic and modern. Authors include W. B. Yeats, Sara Teasdale, Langston Hughes, Robert Frost, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Kate Chopin, Amy Tan, and Richard Rodriguez. Students read Shakespeare’s Macbeth. They are offered a choice of novels and longer works to study, including works by Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Elie Wiesel, and many others. Language Skills: In this course, students become more proficient writers and readers. In composition lessons, students analyze model essays from readers’ and writers’ perspectives, focusing on ideas and content, structure and organization, style, word choice, and tone. Students receive feedback during the writing process to help them work toward a polished final draft . In addition to writing formal essays, resumes, and business letters, students write and deliver a persuasive speech. Students expand their knowledge of grammar, usage, and mechanics through sentence analysis and structure, syntax, agreement, and conventions. Unit pretests identify skills to address more fully. Students strengthen their vocabularies through thematic units focused on word roots, suffixes and prefixes, context clues, and other important vocabulary-building strategies.

    Prerequisites

    Literary Analysis and Composition I (Comprehensive) or equivalent.

  • English 3 Honors Semester 1

    English (inc AP)Full Credit

    Students read and analyze works of American literature from colonial to contemporary times, including poetry, short stories, novels, drama, and nonfiction.

    Course Description

    In this course, students read and analyze works of American literature from colonial to contemporary times, including poetry, short stories, novels, drama, and nonfiction. The literary works provide opportunities for critical writing, creative projects, and online discussions. Students develop vocabulary skills and refresh their knowledge of grammar, usage, and mechanics in preparation for standardized tests. Students enrolled in this challenging course will also complete independent projects that deepen their understanding of the themes and ideas presented in the curriculum.

    Prerequisites

    Honors Literary Analysis and Composition II (or equivalent) and teacher/school counselor recommendation.

  • English 3 Semester 1

    English (inc AP)Full Credit

    Students read and analyze works of American literature from colonial to contemporary times, including poetry, short stories, novels, drama, and nonfiction.

    Course Description

    In this course, students read and analyze works of American literature from colonial to contemporary times, including poetry, short stories, novels, drama, and nonfiction. The literary works provide opportunities for critical writing, creative projects, and online discussions. Students develop vocabulary skills and refresh their knowledge of grammar, usage, and mechanics in preparation for standardized tests.

    Prerequisites

    Literary Analysis and Composition II (Comprehensive) or equivalent.

  • English 4 Honors Semester 1

    English (inc AP)Full Credit

    Students read and analyze works of British and world literature.

    Course Description

    Students read and analyze works of British and world literature that reflect the rich and diverse history of the Western world. As students progress through centuries of literature in a loose chronological arrangement, they will see how British and world literature has been shaped by concerns, values, and ideas that have intrigued, delighted, and challenged people throughout time. Throughout the course, poetry, short stories, novels, drama, and nonfiction provide opportunities for critical writing, creative projects, and online discussions. Students develop vocabulary skills and refresh their knowledge of grammar, usage, and mechanics in preparation for standardized tests. Students enrolled in this challenging course will also complete independent projects that extend their knowledge and deepen their understanding of the themes and ideas presented in the curriculum.

    Prerequisites

    Honors Literary Analysis and Composition II (or equivalent) or Honors American Literature (or equivalent), and teacher/school counselor recommendation.

  • English 4 Semester 1

    English (inc AP)Full Credit

    Students read and analyze works of British and world literature that reflect the rich and diverse history of the Western world.

    Course Description

    Students read and analyze works of British and world literature that reflect the rich and diverse history of the Western world. As students progress through centuries of literature in a loose chronological arrangement, they will see how British and world literature has been shaped by concerns, values, and ideas that have intrigued, delighted, and challenged people throughout time. Throughout the course, poetry, short stories, novels, drama, and nonfiction provide opportunities for critical writing, creative projects, and online discussions. Students develop vocabulary skills and refresh their knowledge of grammar, usage, and mechanics in preparation for standardized tests.

    Prerequisites

    American Literature (Comprehensive) or equivalent.

  • Environmental Science

    ScienceHalf Credit

    This course surveys key topic areas of Environmental Science.

    Course Description

    This course surveys key topic areas, including the application of scientific process to environmental analysis; ecology; energy flow; ecological structures; earth systems; and atmospheric, land, and water science. Topics also include the management of natural resources and analysis of private and governmental decisions involving the environment. Students explore actual case studies and conduct five hands-on, unit-long research activities, learning that political and private decisions about the environment and the use of resources require accurate application of scientific processes, including proper data collection and responsible conclusions.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Environmental Science (Block)

    Department: Science
    Half Credit

  • Family and Consumer Science

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    In this one-semester course, students develop skills and knowledge to help them transition into adult roles within the family.

    Course Description

    In this one-semester course, students develop skills and knowledge to help them transition into adult roles within the family. They learn to make wise consumer choices, prepare nutritious meals, contribute effectively as part of a team, manage a household budget, and balance roles of work and family. They gain an appreciation for the responsibilities of family members throughout the life span and the contributions to the well-being of the family and the community.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Fashion and Interior Design EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Students learn the basics of color and design, then test their skills through hands-on projects.

    Course Description

    From the clothes we wear to the homes we live in, fashion and design is all around us. In this course, students who have a flair for fashion or who constantly redecorate their room find out what it is like to work in the design industry by exploring career possibilities and the background needed to pursue them. Students learn the basics of color and design, then test their skills through hands-on projects. They also learn essential communication skills that build success in any business. By the end of the course, students are well on their way to developing the portfolio needed to get started in this exciting field.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Fine Arts (Semester 1)

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Full Credit

    This course combines art history, appreciation, and analysis, while engaging students in hands-on creative projects.

    Course Description

    This course combines art history, appreciation, and analysis, while engaging students in hands-on creative projects. Lessons introduce major periods and movements in art history while focusing on masterworks and the intellectual, technical, and creative processes behind those works. Studio lessons provide opportunities for drawing, painting, sculpting, and other creative endeavors.

    Prerequisites

    A survey course in World History is recommended as a prerequisite or co-requisite, but not required.

  • Forensic Science

    ScienceHalf Credit

    This one-semester course surveys key topics in forensic science.

    Course Description

    This one-semester course surveys key topics in forensic science, including the application of the scientific process to forensic analysis, procedures and principles of crime scene investigation, physical and trace evidence, and the law and courtroom procedures from the perspective of the forensic scientist. Through online lessons, virtual and hands-on labs, and analysis of fictional crime scenarios, students learn about forensic tools, technical resources, forming and testing hypotheses, proper data collection, and responsible conclusions.

    Prerequisites

    Successful completion of at least two years of high school science, including Biology (Comprehensive); Chemistry (Comprehensive) is highly recommended; or equivalents.

  • Foundations in Algebra

    Math (inc AP)Full Credit

    Part 1 of a two-course integrated sequence that should be offered to students who may need additional support in order to be successful in Algebra 1.

    Course Description

    Algebra 1 is the backbone of high school mathematics and prepares students for success in all subsequent mathematics courses. Therefore, it is crucial that all students are successful in Algebra 1. As a result, one pathway offered to South Carolina students includes a two-course integrated sequence that should be offered to students who may need additional support in order to be successful in Algebra 1. South Carolina College- and Career-Ready (SCCCR) Foundations in Algebra is the first course in this two-course integrated sequence designed to prepare students for college and career readiness by providing a foundation in algebra, probability, and statistics.

    This course builds on the conceptual knowledge and skills students mastered in earlier grades in areas such as algebraic thinking, probability, data analysis, and proportional reasoning. Students who complete this two course integrated sequence will be given the opportunity to master several standards from SCCCR Algebra 2 and SCCCR Probability and Statistics in addition to all of the standards from SCCCR Algebra 1.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • French IV (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    Students complete their high school French language education with this two-semester course.

    Course Description

    Students complete their high school French language education with this two-semester course that, like all of its predecessors, conforms to the national standards of the ACTFL. The instructional material in French IV enables students to use the conditional and subjunctive tenses, and talk about the past with increasing ease, distinguishing which tense to use and when. It also helps students hone their listening skills to enhance their understanding of native speech patterns on familiar topics. Students expand their knowledge of French-speaking countries’ culture, history, and geography and learn about francophone contributions in the arts.

    Prerequisites

    French III

  • Geography (Semester 1 Block)

    Department: Social Studies
    Full Credit

  • Geography (Semester 1)

    Department: Social Studies
    Full Credit

  • Geometry (Semester 1)

    Math (inc AP)Full Credit

    In this comprehensive course, students are challenged to recognize and work with geometric concepts in various contexts.

    Course Description

    In this comprehensive course, students are challenged to recognize and work with geometric concepts in various contexts. They build on ideas of inductive and deductive reasoning, logic, concepts, and techniques of Euclidean plane and solid geometry. They develop deeper understandings of mathematical structure, method, and applications of Euclidean plane and solid geometry. Students use visualizations, spatial reasoning, and geometric modeling to solve problems. Topics of study include points, lines, and angles; triangles; right triangles; quadrilaterals and other polygons; circles; coordinate geometry; three-dimensional solids; geometric constructions; symmetry; the use of transformations; and non-Euclidean geometries.

    Prerequisites

    Algebra I (Comprehensive) or equivalent.

  • Geometry Honors (Semester 1)

    Math (inc AP)Full Credit

    Students work with advanced geometric concepts in various contexts.

    Course Description

    Students work with advanced geometric concepts in various contexts. They build in depth ideas of inductive and deductive reasoning, logic, concepts, and techniques of Euclidean plane and solid geometry. They also develop a sophisticated understanding of mathematical structure, method, and applications of Euclidean plane and solid geometry. Students use visualizations, spatial reasoning, and geometric modeling to solve problems. Topics of study include points, lines, and angles; triangles; right triangles; quadrilaterals and other polygons; circles; coordinate geometry; three-dimensional solids; geometric constructions; symmetry; the use of transformations; and non-Euclidean geometries. Students work on additional challenging assignments, assessments, and research projects.

    Prerequisites

    Algebra I (Comprehensive) or Honors Algebra I (or equivalent) and teacher/school counselor recommendation

  • German I (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    Students begin their introduction to German by focusing on the four key areas of world language study.

    Course Description

    Students begin their introduction to German by focusing on the four key areas of world language study: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course represents an ideal blend of language learning pedagogy and online learning. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; become familiar with common vocabulary terms and phrases; comprehend a wide range of grammar patterns; participate in simple conversations and respond appropriately to basic conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries; and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • German II (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    Students continue their study of German by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts.

    Course Description

    Students continue their study of German by further expanding their knowledge of key vocabulary topics and grammar concepts. Students not only begin to comprehend listening and reading passages more fully, but they also are able to express themselves more meaningfully in both speaking and writing. Each unit consists of a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, multimedia cultural presentations, and interactive activities and practices which reinforce vocabulary and grammar. There is a strong emphasis on providing context and conversational examples for the language concepts presented in each unit. Students should expect to be actively engaged in their own language learning; understand common vocabulary terms and phrases; use a wide range of grammar patterns in their speaking and writing; participate in conversations and respond appropriately to conversational prompts; analyze and compare cultural practices, products, and perspectives of various German-speaking countries; and take frequent assessments where their language progression can be monitored. By the second semester, the course is conducted almost entirely in German. The course has been carefully aligned to national standards as set forth by ACTFL.

    Prerequisites

    German I

  • German III (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    This course expands the scope of concepts and information that students mastered in the German I and II courses.

    Course Description

    This course expands the scope of concepts and information that students mastered in the German I and II courses and aligns with national ACTFL standards. Students learn increasingly complex grammatical constructions such as present, imperfect, perfect, and future tenses; reflexive and modal verbs; prepositions; conjunctions; relative pronouns; and adjective endings. Unit themes in this two-semester course include vacations, travel, leisure time, healthy living, body parts and ailments, family members, rights and responsibilities, household chores, university study, military service, personal relationships, the importance of appearance, emotions, fairy tales, and animals. Unit activities blend different forms of communication and culture.

    Prerequisites

    German II

  • German IV (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    German IV builds on the foundation of the first three courses.

    Course Description

    German IV builds on the foundation of the first three courses. Students continue to sharpen their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills while also learning to express themselves on topics relevant to German culture. Authentic texts, current culture, and literature from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland all form part of the instructional material for this course. Each unit focuses on a particular region or city and includes such themes as culture, tourism, and current events. These units cover topics such as contemporary and classical music, expressing opinion, German history, transportation, family weekend travel, shopping, free-time activities, technology, multiculturalism, education, and careers.

    Prerequisites

    German III

  • Gothic Literature EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This course focuses on the major themes found in Gothic literature.

    Course Description

    Since the eighteenth century, Gothic tales have influenced fiction writers and fascinated readers. This course focuses on the major themes found in Gothic literature and demonstrates how the core writing drivers produce a suspenseful environment for readers. Some of the recurring themes and elements found in the genre are also presented. As they complete the course, students gain an understanding of and an appreciation for the complex nature of Gothic literature.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Government

    Social StudiesHalf Credit

    This course studies the history, organization, and functions of the United States government.

    Course Description

    This course studies the history, organization, and functions of the United States government. Beginning with the Declaration of Independence and continuing through to the present day, students explore the relationship between individual Americans and our governing bodies. Students take a close look at the political culture of our country and gain insight into the challenges faced by citizens, elected government officials, political activists, and others. Students also learn about the roles of political parties, interest groups, the media, and the Supreme Court, and discuss their own views on current political issues.

    Prerequisites

    U.S. History (Comprehensive) or equivalent is recommended, but not required.

  • Great Minds in Science EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This course focuses on ten of today’s greatest scientific minds.

    Course Description

    Is there life on other planets? What extremes can the human body endure? Can the global warming problem be solved? Today, scientists, explorers, and writers are working to answer all of these questions. Like Edison, Einstein, Curie, and Newton, the scientists of today are asking questions and working on problems that may revolutionize our lives and world. This course focuses on ten of today’s greatest scientific minds. Each unit takes an in-depth look at one of these individuals, and shows how their ideas may help to shape tomorrow’s world.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Health Science I EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    The course presents information and terminology for the health sciences and examines the contributions of different health science areas.

    Course Description

    Will we ever find a cure for cancer? What treatments are best for conditions like diabetes and asthma? How are illnesses like meningitis, tuberculosis, and the measles identified and diagnosed? Health sciences provide the answers to questions such as these. In this course, students will be introduced to the various disciplines within the health sciences, including toxicology, clinical medicine, and biotechnology. They will explore the importance of diagnostics and research in the identification and treatment of diseases. The course presents information and terminology for the health sciences and examines the contributions of different health science areas.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Health Science II EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This course is designed to further students’ understanding of the health care workplace.

    Course Description

    Health Science II is designed to further students’ understanding of the health care workplace, including patient and caregiver interactions and how various members of the health care team work together to create an ethical, functional and compassionate environment for patients.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • History of the Holocaust EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    In this course, students study the history of anti-Semitism; the rise of the Nazi party; and the Holocaust.

    Course Description

    Holocaust education requires a comprehensive study of not only times, dates, and places, but also the motivation and ideology that allowed these events. In this course, students study the history of anti-Semitism; the rise of the Nazi party; and the Holocaust, from its beginnings through liberation and the aftermath of the tragedy. The study of the Holocaust is a multi-disciplinary one, integrating world history, geography, American history, and civics. Through this in-depth, semester-long study of the Holocaust, high school students gain an understanding of the ramifications of prejudice and indifference, the potential for government-supported terror, and get glimpses of kindness and humanity in the worst of times.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Honor Physics (Semester 1)

    ScienceFull Credit

    This advanced course surveys all key areas of physics.

    Course Description

    This advanced course surveys all key areas: physical systems, measurement, kinematics, dynamics, momentum, energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, and magnetism, and introduces students to modern physics topics such as quantum theory and the atomic nucleus. Additional honors assignments include debates, research papers, extended collaborative laboratories, and virtual laboratories. The course gives a solid basis for moving on to more advanced college physics courses. The program consists of online instruction, virtual laboratories, and related assessments, plus an associated problem-solving book.

    Prerequisites

    Algebra II or Honors Algebra II, Pre-Calculus/Trigonometry, and teacher/school counselor recommendation.

  • Hospitality & Tourism: Traveling the Globe EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This course introduces students to hotel and restaurant management, cruise ships, spas, resorts, theme parks, and other segments of the industry.

    Course Description

    With greater disposable income and more opportunities for business travel, people are traversing the globe in greater numbers. As a result, hospitality and tourism is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. This course introduces students to hotel and restaurant management, cruise ships, spas, resorts, theme parks, and other segments of the industry. Students learn about key hospitality issues; the development and management of tourist locations; event planning; marketing; and environmental issues related to leisure and travel. The course also examines some current and future trends in the field.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Image Design and Editing

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This introductory design course is for students who want to create compelling, professional-looking graphic designs and photos.

    Course Description

    This introductory design course is for students who want to create compelling, professional-looking graphic designs and photos. Students learn the basics of composition, color, and layout through the use of hands-on projects that allow them to use their creativity while developing important foundational skills. They use GIMP soft ware to create a graphic design portfolio with a wide variety of projects involving the mastery of technical topics, such as working with layers and masks, adding special effects, and effectively using typefaces to create visual impact. The projects help students develop the skills they need to create and edit images of their own.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Intermediate Algebra

    Math (inc AP)Full Credit

    Part 2 of a two-course integrated sequence that should be offered to students who may need additional support in order to be successful in Algebra 1.

    Course Description

    Algebra 1 is the backbone of high school mathematics and prepares students for success in all subsequent mathematics courses. Therefore, it is crucial that all students are successful in Algebra 1. As a result, one pathway offered to South Carolina students includes a two-course integrated sequence that should be offered to students who may need additional support in order to be successful in Algebra 1. South Carolina College- and Career-Ready (SCCCR) Intermediate Algebra is the second course in this two-course integrated sequence designed to prepare students for college and career readiness by providing a foundation in algebra, probability, and statistics.

    This course builds on the conceptual knowledge and skills students mastered in SCCCR Foundations in Algebra and in earlier grades in areas such as algebraic thinking, statistics, data analysis, and proportional reasoning. Students who complete this two-course integrated sequence will be given the opportunity to master several standards from SCCCR Algebra 2 and SCCCR Probability and Statistics in addition to all of the standards from SCCCR Algebra 1.

    In this course, students are expected to apply mathematics in meaningful ways to solve problems that arise in the workplace, society, and everyday life through the process of modeling. Mathematical modeling involves creating appropriate equations, graphs, functions, or other mathematical representations to analyze real-world situations and answer questions. Use of technological tools, such as hand-held graphing calculators, is important in creating and analyzing mathematical representations used in the modeling process and should be used during instruction and assessment. However, technology should not be limited to hand-held graphing calculators. Students should use a variety of technologies, such as graphing utilities, spreadsheets, statistical software, and computer algebra systems, to solve problems and to master standards in all Key Concepts of this course.

    This course has a state End-of Course (EOC) exam that will count as 20% of your final grade.

    Prerequisites

    Foundations in Algebra

  • International Business EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This course helps students develop the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to live and work in the global marketplace

    Course Description

    From geography to culture, global business is an exciting topic in the business community today. This course helps students develop the appreciation, knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to live and work in the global marketplace. It takes a global view of business, investigating why and how companies go international, and how they are more interconnected. Students gain an understanding of how economic, social, cultural, political, and legal factors influence both domestic and cross-border business. Business structures, global entrepreneurship, business management, marketing, and the challenges of managing international organizations are also explored. The course helps students cultivate a mindfulness of how history, geography, language, cultural studies, research skills, and continuing education are important in twenty-first century business activities.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Introduction to Agriscience EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Learn about the development and maintenance of agriculture, animal systems, natural resources, and other food sources.

    Course Description

    Agriculture has played an important role in the lives of humans for thousands of years. It has fed us and given us materials that have helped us survive. Today, scientists and practitioners are working to improve and better understand agriculture and how it can be used to continue to sustain human life. In this course, students learn about the development and maintenance of agriculture, animal systems, natural resources, and other food sources. Students also examine the relationship between agriculture and natural resources and the environment, health, politics, and world trade.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Introduction to Culinary Arts EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Learn all about food, including food culture, food history, food safety, and current food trends.

    Course Description

    Food is fundamental to life. Not only does it feed our bodies, but it’s often the centerpiece for family gatherings and social functions. In this course, students learn all about food, including food culture, food history, food safety, and current food trends. They also learn about the food service industry and how to prepare some culinary dishes. Through hands-on activities and in-depth study of the culinary arts field, this course helps students hone their cooking skills and gives them the opportunity to explore careers in the food industry.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Introduction to Manufacturing EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    A behind-the-scenes look at the vast industry called manufacturing.

    Course Description

    America has been called a land of consumers. Our society has become accustomed to the luxury of purchasing commodities from retail stores in a way that is convenient and affordable. Most of us don’t take the time to think much past the checkout line, however. Where do these products come from exactly? Were they made in our country or shipped in from somewhere else entirely? What machines and equipment were used to make the items we purchase? Who are the people involved in manufacturing and assembling the finished goods that line the shelves of our favorite stores? This course will give you a behind-the-scenes look at the vast industry called manufacturing. In this unit, you’ll examine the basics of manufacturing, including a brief history and some of the basic processes and principles that work together to transform raw materials into useful and valuable commodities.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Japanese I (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    Students become familiar with the fundamental concepts and constructions of the Japanese language.

    Course Description

    Students become familiar with the fundamental concepts and constructions of the Japanese language as well as the rich and ancient world of Japanese culture in this two-semester course. Japanese I has been designed to meet ACTFL standards. Unit topics consist of the alphabet and numbers; greetings; introductions; the calendar (days, months, and seasons); weather; time; colors; familiar objects and places; family; food; pastimes; and school objects and routine. Course strategies include warm-up activities, vocabulary study, reading, threaded discussions, multimedia presentations, self-checks, practice activities and games, oral and written assignments, projects, quizzes, and exams.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Japanese II (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    Course content blends different forms of communication and culture via unit activities to ensure that students meet all ACTFL standards.

    Course Description

    In Japanese II, course content blends different forms of communication and culture via unit activities to ensure that students meet all ACTFL standards. These standards call for a focus on successful oral and written communication as well as a thorough grounding in Japanese culture. Unit themes for both semesters cover a broad range of useful everyday subjects, including daily routine, animals, entertainment, body parts, rooms and furniture, shopping and clothing, meals, sports and recreation, and transportation. Students must successfully complete Japanese I in order to enroll in this course.

    Prerequisites

    Japanese I

  • Journalism

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Students are introduced to the historical importance of journalism in America.

    Course Description

    Students are introduced to the historical importance of journalism in America. They study the basic principles of print and online journalism as they examine the role of printed news media in our society. They learn investigative skills, responsible reporting, and journalistic writing techniques as they read, respond to, and write their own news and feature articles. Students conduct interviews, research, write, and design their own publications.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Latin I (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    This two-semester course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of Latin grammar.

    Course Description

    This two-semester course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of Latin grammar. Students develop the skills necessary to translate basic sentences from Latin into English and from English into Latin, and to read simple connected passages of Latin prose and poetry. In the process, students learn how verb conjugations and noun declensions work in a highly inflected language and how to analyze the structure of Latin sentences. The course includes a cross-cultural component, introducing students to the world of ancient Rome by allowing them to acquire knowledge—through word study—of Roman institutions, practices, religious beliefs, and ideological ways of thought.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Latin II (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    Latin II builds on the foundation in Latin grammar provided by the Latin I course.

    Course Description

    Latin II builds on the foundation in Latin grammar provided by the Latin I course and also includes an in-depth study of Roman mythology and history. Students expand their use of declensions, adjectives, adverbs, and cases. These skills enable them to translate longer Latin texts into English that require a more complex knowledge of grammar rather than just vocabulary. To practice oral Latin skills, students engage in conversations, seek and give items of information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions. Latin II also takes students on a tour of the ancient classical world, including literature, historical workers, and the lives of famous and influential Romans.

    Prerequisites

    Latin I

  • Law & Order/Legal Studies EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Learn how our lives are guided and regulated by our society’s legal expectations—and become more informed and responsible citizens.

    Course Description

    Every society has laws that its citizens must follow. From traffic laws to regulations on how the government operates, laws help provide society with order and structure. Consumer laws help protect society from faulty goods; criminal laws help protect society from individuals who harm others; and family law handles the arrangements and issues that arise in areas like divorce and child custody. By understanding the workings of our court system, as well as how laws are actually carried out, students learn how our lives are guided and regulated by our society’s legal expectations—and become more informed and responsible citizens.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Life Skills

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This one-semester elective is designed to increase students’ knowledge of and ability in using the skills necessary for everyday living.

    Course Description

    This one-semester elective is designed to increase students’ knowledge of and ability in using the skills necessary for everyday living. Life Skills emphasizes defining personal values, goal-setting and planning, and solving problems. Instructional material focuses on dealing with media and peer pressure, communication and relationships, working with others, avoiding and/or resolving conflict, decision making, wellness and personal safety, aspects of good citizenship, environmental awareness, and how students can contribute to their own community. The course is organized in six units: Course Introduction; Thinking About Yourself; Thinking for Yourself; Taking Care of Yourself; Caring for Your Relationships; and Caring About Your World.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Mandarin (Chinese) I (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    Mandarin (Chinese) I introduces students to the study of the Chinese language.

    Course Description

    Mandarin (Chinese) I introduces students to the study of the Chinese language. Students learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through activities that are based on pedagogically proven methods of world language instruction. Instructional material introduces simple grammatical concepts in innovative ways and provides practice activities with a variety of learning styles in mind. This two-semester course sprinkles culture throughout the units to help students focus on the Chinese-speaking world, its culture, people, geographical locations, and history. Unit themes include greetings, numbers, family members, school life, clothing, daily routine, shopping, and restaurant menus. The course is aligned with national ACTFL standards.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Mandarin (Chinese) II (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    This two-semester course is a continuation of the introductory-level Mandarin (Chinese) I course.

    Course Description

    This two-semester course is a continuation of the introductory-level Mandarin (Chinese) I course. It presents students with new, more complicated areas of Chinese language learning. Units cover a variety of material that is useful to students learning everyday conversational arts. Themes include daily routine, animals, hobbies, the body, descriptions, home life, shopping, entertainment, sports, and travel. Throughout the course, students learn to express themselves using an ever increasing vocabulary of present tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. They gain the skills and confidence necessary to talk about daily activities, leisure-time pursuits and hobbies, body parts and their function, and people and culture.

    Prerequisites

    Chinese I

  • Middlebury AP French (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    The AP French Language and Culture course is an advanced language course that prepares students for the AP French Language and Culture Exam.

    Course Description

    The AP French Language and Culture course is an advanced language course that prepares students for the AP French Language and Culture Exam. It uses as its foundation the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. The course is conducted almost exclusively in French, and is based on the six themes required by the College Board: (1) global challenges, (2) science and technology, (3) contemporary life, (4) personal and public identities, (5) families and communities, and (6) beauty and aesthetics. The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students should expect to listen to, read, and understand a wide variety of authentic French-language materials and sources; demonstrate proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication using French; gain knowledge and understanding of the cultures of the Francophone world; use French to connect with other disciplines and expand knowledge in a wide variety of contexts; develop insight into the nature of the French language and its culture; and use French to participate in communities at home and around the world. The AP French Language and Culture course is a college-level course. The intensity, quality, and amount of course material can be compared to that of a third-year college course.

    Prerequisites

    Strong success in French III, or success in French IV (or equivalents), and teacher/ school counselor recommendation.

  • Middlebury AP Spanish Language (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    An advanced language course in which students are directly prepared for the AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam.

    Course Description

    The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is an advanced language course in which students are directly prepared for the AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam. It uses as its foundation the three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. The course is conducted almost exclusively in Spanish, and is based on the six themes required by the College Board: (1) global challenges, (2) science and technology, (3) contemporary life, (4) personal and public identities, (5) families and communities, and (6) beauty and aesthetics. The course teaches language structures in context and focuses on the development of fluency to convey meaning. Students explore culture in both contemporary and historical contexts to develop an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives. Students should expect to listen to, read, and understand a wide variety of authentic Spanish-language materials and sources; demonstrate proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication using Spanish; gain knowledge and understanding of the cultures of Spanish-speaking areas of the world; use Spanish to connect with other disciplines and expand knowledge in a wide variety of contexts; develop insight into the nature of the Spanish language and its culture; and use Spanish to participate in communities at home and around the world. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is a college-level course. The intensity, quality, and amount of course material can be compared to that of a third-year college course.

    Prerequisites

    Strong success in Spanish III, or success in Spanish IV (or equivalents), and teacher/ school counselor recommendation

  • Music Appreciation (Semester 1)

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Full Credit

    This course introduces students to the history, theory, and genres of music.

    Course Description

    This course introduces students to the history, theory, and genres of music. The first semester covers basic music theory concepts as well as early musical forms, classical music, patriotic and nationalistic music, and twentieth-century music. The second semester presents modern traditions, including American jazz, gospel, folk, soul, blues, Latin rhythms, rock and roll, and hip hop. The course explores the history of music, from the surviving examples of rudimentary musical forms through to contemporary pieces from around the world. The first semester covers early musical forms, classical music, and American jazz. The second semester presents modern traditions, including gospel, folk, soul, blues, Latin rhythms, rock and roll, and hip hop. The course explores the relationship between music and social movements and reveals how the emergent global society and the prominence of the Internet are making musical forms more accessible worldwide.

    To comply with certain state standards for the arts, a student “performance practicum” is required for full credit each semester. The performance practicum requirement can be met through participation in supervised instrumental or vocal lessons, church or community choirs, community musical performances, or any other structured program that meets at regular intervals and provides opportunities for students to build vocal and/ or instrumental skills. Parents or guardians will be required to present their proposed practicum to the students’ teachers for approval, and validate their children’s regular participation in the chosen performance practicum.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Mythology and Folklore EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Explore the universality and social significance of myths and folklore, and see how these are still used to shape society today.

    Course Description

    Mighty heroes. Angry gods and goddesses. Cunning animals. Since the first people gathered around fires, mythology and folklore have been used as a way to make sense of humankind and our world. Beginning with an overview of mythology and different kinds of folklore, students journey with ancient heroes as they slay dragons and outwit gods, follow fearless warrior women into battle, and watch as clever monsters overcome those stronger than themselves. They explore the universality and social significance of myths and folklore, and see how these are still used to shape society today.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Nutrition and Wellness

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    An overview of good nutrition principles that are necessary for physical and mental wellness and a long, healthy life.

    Course Description

    This one-semester elective course provides students with an overview of good nutrition principles that are necessary for physical and mental wellness and a long, healthy life. Instructional materials include discussions of digestion, basic nutrients, weight management, sports and fitness, and lifespan nutrition. The Nutrition and Wellness course emphasizes an understanding of today’s food and eating trends and gives students the capacity to intelligently evaluate all available sources of nutrition information and make informed decisions. The course is organized in six units: Course Introduction; Wellness and Food Choices in Today’s World; Digestion and Major Nutrients; Body Size and Weight Management; Physical Fitness, Sports Nutrition, and Stress; and Life Cycle Nutrition.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Peer Counseling EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This course explains the role of a peer counselor.

    Course Description

    Helping people achieve their goals is one of the most rewarding of human experiences. Peer counselors help individuals reach their goals by offering them support, encouragement, and resource information. This course explains the role of a peer counselor, teaches observation, listening, and emphatic communication skills that counselors need, and provides basic training in conflict resolution, and group leadership. Not only will this course help prepare students to work as peer counselors, but the skills they learn will enhance their ability to communicate effectively in personal and work relationships.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Philosophy EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This one-semester course takes students on an exciting adventure that covers more than 2,500 years of history!

    Course Description

    This one-semester course takes students on an exciting adventure that covers more than 2,500 years of history! Along the way, they run into some very strange characters. For example, they read about a man who hung out on street corners, barefoot and dirty, pestering everyone he met with questions. They learn about another eccentric who climbed inside a stove to think about whether he existed. Despite their odd behavior, these and other philosophers of the Western world are among the most brilliant and influential thinkers of all time. As students learn about these great thinkers, they come to see how and where many of the most fundamental ideas of Western Civilization originated. Students also get a chance to ask themselves some of the same questions these great thinkers pondered. By the time they “close the book” on this course, students have a better understand themselves and the world around them—from atoms to outer space—and everything in between.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Physical Education (Semester 1)

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Full Credit

    Learn a wide variety of fitness concepts that they will be able to use in their everyday life.

    Course Description

    Through this one-semester credit recovery course, students learn a wide variety of fitness concepts that they will be able to use in their everyday life. The course addresses the fundamentals of physical fitness, including goal setting and target heart rate. Students learn how their body works by studying static and dynamic balance, linear and rotary motion, anatomy, and biomechanics. They are introduced to a variety of lifetime activities, including tennis, golf, Frisbee, and orienteering. They also learn about activities that promote cardiorespiratory fitness, including kickboxing, hip hop dance, fitness walking, and cycling. Pilates, yoga, and breathing exercises that help promote physical and emotional wellness are addressed as well.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • PreCalculus & Trigonometry (Semester 1)

    Math (inc AP)Full Credit

    Pre-calculus weaves together previous study of algebra, geometry, and functions into a preparatory course for calculus.

    Course Description

    Pre-calculus weaves together previous study of algebra, geometry, and functions into a preparatory course for calculus. The course focuses on the mastery of critical skills and exposure to new skills necessary for success in subsequent math courses. Topics include linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, polynomial, and rational functions; systems of equations; and conic sections in the first semester. The second semester covers trigonometric ratios and functions; inverse trigonometric functions; applications of trigonometry, including vectors and laws of cosine and sine; polar functions and notation; and arithmetic of complex numbers.

    Cross-curricular connections are made throughout the course to calculus, art, history, and a variety of other fields related to mathematics.

    Prerequisites

    Geometry (Comprehensive) and Algebra II (Comprehensive) or equivalents.

  • Probability and Statistics

    Math (inc AP)Full Credit

    Students learn counting methods, probability, descriptive statistics, graphs of data, the normal curve, statistical inference, and linear regression.

    Course Description

    Students learn counting methods, probability, descriptive statistics, graphs of data, the normal curve, statistical inference, and linear regression. Proficiency is measured through frequent online and offline assessments as well as asynchronous discussions. Problem-solving activities provide an opportunity for students to demonstrate their skills in real world situations.

    Prerequisites

    Algebra II (Core) or equivalent

  • Programming I: VB.Net

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Learn basic programming and the essential concepts of VisualBasic.NET (VB.NET)

    Course Description

    Students learn basic programming and the essential concepts of VisualBasic.NET (VB.NET) in this one-semester course. As an introduction to VB.NET, students are taught the basic uses of the programming language, its similarities to the English language and others, its architecture, program fl ow, and its flexibility as a programming language. The course helps participants understand the processes involved in soft ware development and object-oriented programming. This is course provides an introduction to programming that could lead to careers such as soft ware engineer, developer, or game designer.

    Prerequisites

    Basic knowledge of computer fundamentals.

  • Programming II: Java

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This introductory-level course presents the understanding of Java and how to build and compile a stand-alone application.

    Course Description

    This introductory-level course presents the understanding of Java and how to build and compile a stand-alone application (working with real-world scenarios). This course is designed especially for students who have very little background, but have taken the Programming I: VB.NET course. This course concentrates on Java programing language, built-in data types, control structures, classes, objects, inheritance, and polymorphism. By the end of the course the student will be able to write basic programs using Java as well as basic applets using updated techniques. Students can pursue further instruction in Java programming and other programming languages.

    Prerequisites

    Programming I, Basic Computer Fundamentals

  • Psychology

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This is an introductory course that broadly covers several areas of psychology.

    Course Description

    In this one-semester course, students investigate why human beings think and act the way they do. This is an introductory course that broadly covers several areas of psychology. Instructional material presents theories and current research for students to critically evaluate and understand. Each unit introduces terminology, theories, and research that are critical to the understanding of psychology and includes tutorials and interactive exercises. Students learn how to define and use key terms of psychology and how to apply psychological principles to their own lives. Units include: Methods of Study, Biological Basis for Behavior, Learning and Memory, Development and Individual Differences, and Psychological Disorders.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Public Speaking

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Students are introduced to public speaking as an important component of their academic, work, and social lives.

    Course Description

    Students are introduced to public speaking as an important component of their academic, work, and social lives. They study public speaking occasions and develop skills as fair and critical listeners, or consumers, of spoken information and persuasion. Students study types of speeches (informative, persuasive, dramatic, and special occasion), read and listen to models of speeches, and prepare and present their own speeches to diverse audiences. Students learn to choose speaking topics and adapt them for specific audiences, to research and support their ideas, and to benefit from listener feedback. They study how to incorporate well-designed visual and multimedia aids in presentations and how to maintain a credible presence in the digital world. Students also learn about the ethics of public speaking and about techniques for managing communication anxiety.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Reaching Your Academic Potential

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This course helps students develop habits for more successful academics.

    Course Description

    Students learn essential academic skills within the context of their learning style, individual learning environment, and long-term goals. This course helps students develop habits for more successful reading, writing, studying, communication, collaboration, time management, and concentration. It also provides insights into how the brain works when they are learning, and ways to maximize its potential.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Real World Parenting EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Students learn what to prepare for, what to expect, and what vital steps parents can take to create the best environment for their children.

    Course Description

    What is the best way to care for children and teach them self-confidence and a sense of responsibility? Parenting involves more than having a child and providing food and shelter. In this one-semester course, students learn what to prepare for, what to expect, and what vital steps parents can take to create the best environment for their children. Parenting roles and responsibilities, nurturing and protective environments for children, positive parenting strategies, and effective communication in parent–child relationships are some of the topics covered in this course.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Resource (Semester 1)

    Department: Resource
    Half Credit

  • Service Learning

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    An introductory unit presents instruction on the nature of service learning.

    Course Description

    This project may be used in a variety of ways—as a stand-alone project, in conjunction with another course, or as a foundation around which to base a one-semester course. An introductory unit presents instruction on the nature of service learning. Students are taught how to identify community needs, select projects that are meaningful to themselves, apply practical skills, reflect on their learning experience, and behave responsibly in a service setting. Students then move on to design and conduct service learning experiences of their own, according to the requirements of their projects. Documents to support teachers in guiding students through the project are included.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Skills for Health

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    The course helps students build the skills they need to protect, enhance, and promote their own health and the health of others.

    Course Description

    This course focuses on important skills and knowledge in nutrition; physical activity; the dangers of substance use and abuse; injury prevention and safety; growth and development; and personal health, environmental conservation, and community health resources. The curriculum is designed around topics and situations that engage student discussion and motivate students to analyze internal and external influences on their health-related decisions. The course helps students build the skills they need to protect, enhance, and promote their own health and the health of others.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Social Problems I EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Become aware of the challenges faced by social groups as they learn about the complex relationship among societies, governments, and the individual.

    Course Description

    Students become aware of the challenges faced by social groups as they learn about the complex relationship among societies, governments, and the individual. Each unit focuses on a particular area of concern, often within a global context. Possible solutions at both the structural level as well as that of the individual are examined. Students learn more about how social problems affect them personally as well as globally, and begin to develop the skills necessary to help make a difference in their own lives and communities.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Social Problems II EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Examine timely social issues affecting individuals and societies around the globe.

    Course Description

    The Social Problems II course continues to examine timely social issues affecting individuals and societies around the globe. Students learn about the overall structure of the social problem as well as how it impacts their lives. Each unit focuses on a particular social problem, including racial discrimination, drug abuse, the loss of community, and urban sprawl, and discusses possible solutions at both individual and structural levels. For each issue, students examine the connections in the global arena involving societies, governments, and the individual.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Sociology I EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)

    Students examine social problems in our increasingly connected world.

    Course Description

    The world is becoming more complex. How do your beliefs, values, and behavior affect the people around you and the world in which we live? Students examine social problems in our increasingly connected world, and learn how human relationships can strongly influence and impact their lives. Exciting online video journeys to an array of areas in the sociological world are an important component of this relevant and engaging course.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Sociology II EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Examine how society itself shapes human action and beliefs—and how in turn these factors re-shape society.

    Course Description

    Sociology is the study of people, social life, and society. By developing a “sociological imagination” students are able to examine how society itself shapes human action and beliefs—and how in turn these factors re-shape society itself! Fascinating online video journeys not only inform students, but motivate them to seek more knowledge on their own.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Spanish IV (Semester 1)

    Foreign LanguageFull Credit

    Fourth-year Spanish expands on the foundation of Spanish grammar and vocabulary that students acquired in the first three courses.

    Course Description

    Fourth-year Spanish expands on the foundation of Spanish grammar and vocabulary that students acquired in the first three courses. As with all the earlier offerings, this culminating-level Spanish language course conforms to ACTFL standards. Students continue to sharpen their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills while also learning to express themselves on topics relevant to Spanish culture. The two-semester course is divided into ten units whose themes include people, achievements, wishes and desires, activities, celebrations, possibilities, the past, the arts, current events, and wrap up and review.

    Prerequisites

    Spanish III

  • Sports and Entertainment Marketing EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Explore basic marketing principles and delve deeper into the multibillion-dollar sports and entertainment marketing industry.

    Course Description

    A career in sports and entertainment marketing may be just the thing for students who dream about playing sports professionally or becoming an agent for a celebrity entertainer. Although this particular form of marketing bears some resemblance to traditional marketing, there are many differences as well—including a lot more glitz and glamour! In this course, students explore basic marketing principles and delve deeper into the multibillion-dollar sports and entertainment marketing industry. Students learn how professional athletes, sports teams, and well-known entertainers are marketed as commodities, and how some of them become billionaires as a result. They also get a glimpse how things work behind the scenes of major sporting events like the Super Bowl, and how they can play a role in such an event.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • US History (Semester 1)

    Social StudiesFull Credit

    A comprehensive view of American history from the first migrations of nomadic people to North America to recent events.

    Course Description

    This course is a full-year survey that provides students with a comprehensive view of American history from the first migrations of nomadic people to North America to recent events. Readings are drawn from The American Odyssey: A History of the United States. Online lessons help students organize their study, explore topics, review in preparation for assessments, and practice skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analyzing primary sources and maps, creating timelines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research.

    Prerequisites

    World History or Modern World Studies (or equivalents).

  • US History Honors (Semester 1)

    Social StudiesFull Credit

    A comprehensive view of American history from the first migrations of nomadic people to North America to recent events.

    Course Description

    This course is a challenging full-year survey that provides students with a comprehensive view of American history from the first migrations of nomadic people to North America to recent events. Readings are drawn from The American Odyssey: A History of the United States. Online lessons help students organize their study, explore topics in depth, review in preparation for assessments, and practice advanced skills of historical thinking and analysis. Activities include analyzing primary sources and maps, creating timelines, completing projects and written assignments, and conducting independent research. Students complete independent projects each semester.

    Prerequisites

    World History or Modern World Studies (or equivalents), success in previous history course, and teacher/school counselor recommendation

  • Veterinary Science EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Examine some of the common diseases and treatments for domestic animals.

    Course Description

    As animals play an increasingly important role in our lives, scientists have sought to learn more about their health and well-being. In this course, students take a look at the animals that live in our homes, on our farms, and in zoos and wildlife sanctuaries, and examine some of the common diseases and treatments for domestic animals. They also learn about toxins, parasites, and infectious diseases that affect not only the animals around us, but at times, humans as well! The course provides an overview of veterinary medicine and science, and how the prevention and treatment of diseases and other health issues are studied and applied.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • Web Design

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    Course introduces students to the mechanics and elements of web design and HTML, and the concepts of planning and organizing websites.

    Course Description

    This one-semester course introduces students to the mechanics and elements of web design and HTML, and the concepts of planning and organizing websites. Students engage in a variety of project based assessments to evaluate their understanding and progress. Aft er completing the course, students are able to understand the planning and organization of a website, the elements of design and HTML. Students also learn how to use a WYSIWIG editor and other online tools to create a website.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • World History (Semester 1)

    Social StudiesFull Credit

    Comprehensive survey of world history from prehistoric to modern times.

    Course Description

    In this comprehensive survey of world history from prehistoric to modern times, students focus in depth on the developments and events that have shaped civilization across time. The course is organized chronologically and, within broad eras, regionally. Lessons address developments in religion, philosophy, the arts, science and technology, and political history. The course also introduces geography concepts and skills within the context of the historical narrative. Online lessons and assessments complement World History: Our Human Story. Students are challenged to consider topics in depth as they analyze primary sources and maps, create timelines, and complete other projects—practicing historical thinking and writing skills as they explore the broad themes and big ideas of human history.

    Prerequisites

    N/A

  • World History Honors (Semester 1)

    Social StudiesFull Credit

    Challenging survey of world history from prehistoric to modern times.

    Course Description

    In this challenging survey of world history from prehistoric to modern times, students focus in depth on the developments and events that have shaped civilization across time. The course is organized chronologically and, within broad eras, regionally. Lessons address developments in religion, philosophy, the arts, science and technology, and political history. The course also introduces geography concepts and skills within the context of the historical narrative. Online lessons and assessments complement World History: Our Human Story. Students are challenged to consider topics in depth as they analyze primary sources and maps, create timelines, and complete other projects—practicing advanced historical thinking and writing skills as they explore the broad themes and big ideas of human history. Students complete an independent honors project each semester.

    Prerequisites

    Teacher/School Counselor recommendation.

  • World Religions EE

    Electives (inc PE & Resource)Half Credit

    This course focuses on the major religions that have played a role in human history.

    Course Description

    Throughout the ages, religions from around the world have shaped the political, social, and cultural aspects of societies. This course focuses on the major religions that have played a role in human history, including Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shintoism, and Taoism. Students trace the major developments in these religions and explore their relationships with social institutions and culture. The course also looks at some of the similarities and differences among the major religions and examines the connections and influences they have.

    Prerequisites

    N/A